CRM TECH  

[Under Construction]

                                Some Past Projects

Cultural Resource Management Reports and Services
 
About CRM TECH SUMMARIES OF PREVIOUS PROJECTS Link to Employment Opportunities at CRM TECH
You are here Since its establishment in 1993, CRM TECH has carried out over 2,000 cultural and paleontological resources studies, including archaeological, historical, and paleontological inventories; archaeological test excavations; archaeological data recovery; monitoring of earth-moving activities for both cultural and paleontological resources; historic building evaluations; documentary and archival research; and consultation with public agencies and Native American representatives; and paleontological investigations.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CRM TECH has developed methods that allow us to efficiently deal with all types cultural resource issues, from the simplest to the most complex.  We have conducted cultural resource studies on some of the most important archaeological and cultural resources in the Inland Empire.  We make sure that our studies maintain the highest standards. 

 While this web page is still being constructed, brief descriptions of some of our projects are presented.

 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL STUDIES

 

INVENTORIES

             A picture of Native American Rock Art

Eastern Riverside County Survey

    CRM TECH has carried out a Phase I cultural resources survey on over 4,000 acres of undeveloped land in eastern Riverside County, California.  As part of the study, CRM TECH carried out a historical/ archaeological resources records search, pursued historical background information, contacted Native American representatives, and carried out a field survey of the planning area.  These procedures resulted in the identification and recordation of numerous archaeological sites, four of which were determined to meet CEQA's definition of "historical resources."

 Mountains Trails Plan

    CRM TECH carried out a cultural resources inventory along 16 miles of proposed foot trails and a 45-acre area designated as a "hot spot" for archaeological sites.  The purpose of the study was to provide the lead agencies responsible for reviewing the proposed undertaking with the necessary information to determine whether the project would have an effect on any "historic properties."  The intensive-level field survey of the study area resulted in the recordation of ten archaeological sites.  Two of these were found to constitute "historic properties" under Section 106 guidelines.

 Reservoir Project

    This particular study involved a Phase I cultural resources investigation of approximately 68 acres of land as well as associated pipeline rights-of-way measuring about 8.8 linear miles in length and 65 feet in width.  As a result, six archaeological sites were identified within the boundaries of the Area of Potential Effects.  Of this total, five sites were found located within a National Register-listed archaeological district, officially known as the "Coachella Valley Fish Traps."  Further research and archaeological fieldwork was recommended in order to establish the significance of these resources.

TESTING AND EVALUATION PROGRAMS

            Excavation in progress

Road Extension Project

    As part of the environmental review process for a proposed road extension project, CRM TECH performed a testing and evaluation program on eight previously recorded archaeological sites located within two ridge systems in western Riverside County, California.  In order to establish the significance of these sites, CRM TECH carried out a re-survey of the study area, detailed feature drawings, surface collection of artifacts, excavation of shovel test pits, units, and a trench, and the analyses of all cultural material recovered.  As a result of these procedures, only one of the sites was deemed not to meet CEQA's definition of a "historical resource."

           A partial projectile point recovered during excavations

Excavations in Santa Barbara County

    The archaeological site was situated within 6.95-acre of land in the unincorporated community of Santa Ynez, Santa Barbara County, California.  CRM TECH was contracted to assess the significance of this site.  The archaeological study carried out at the site resulted in the determination that the site did indeed qualify as a "historic property" as a property of traditional cultural value and due to its demonstrated information potential.  Thus, it was recommended that either the site be protected in a designated preservation zone, preserved beneath capping while allowing some land development, or excavated in a comprehensive data recovery program.

 

SanJacinto-Santa Rosa Mountains Project

    In order to establish the historical significance of five archaeological sites located in the foothills of the San Jacinto-Santa Rosa Mountains, CRM TECH carried out a testing and evaluation program.  Four of these sites were determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places as a result of the study.  The data recovery efforts undertaken at these sites served to reduce impacts to these "historic properties" to a level of less than significant.

 

DATA RECOVERY AND OTHER MITIGATION PROGRAMS

Archaeological Mitigation and Data Recovery at a Site near Indio

    This site consists of the remains of the historic-period Cahuilla village of Tuikiktum Hemki, which came under the leadership of Old, Old Chief Cabazon in the mid-19th century.  CRM TECH was contracted to perform an archaeological data recovery program at the site, including field mapping, surface collection of artifacts, and the excavations of hundreds of units, shovel test pits, and backhoe trenches.  As a result, thousands of artifacts along with 50+ archaeological features were encountered at the site.  The intensive data recovery efforts at the site resulted in the mitigation of project effects to this important village site.

 

Excavations in progress

 

Excavations of a Rock Shelter

    CRM TECH was contracted by the project proponent to develop a mitigation program that would minimize impacts to the rock shelter, which was previously determined to qualify as a "historical resource," under CEQA guidelines.  As part of the mitigation measures, approximately 10% of the site was excavated, thus yielding sufficient information on the prehistory of this feature without causing great disturbance.  All artifacts recovered were analyzed and the resulting data was interpreted and presented in a final report.  Furthermore, it was recommended that the rock shelter be incorporated into part of an open space accessible to the public, thus protecting the remaining 90% of the resource, with a plaque mounted near the shelter indicating its significance to the prehistory of the Coachella Valley.

 

Historic-Period Homestead Site

    A data recovery program was implemented at the site of a historic-period homestead that was previously determined to qualify as a "historical resource," under CEQA guidelines.  In order to recover as much data as possible, CRM TECH carried out an intensive-level re-survey of the site area along with site mapping, surface collection of artifacts, excavation of units, and laboratory analysis of all artifacts recovered.  As a result, excavations at the site found that the ruins of the homestead were remarkably well preserved and represented a rare example of the remains of a late nineteenth century homestead.  The data recovery efforts reduced the project's effects on this historical resource to a level of less than significant.

 MONITORING OF EARTH-MOVING ACTIVITIES

Housing Development Project near Hemet, California

    CRM TECH provided archaeological monitoring services for the project, encompassing approximately 675 acres of undeveloped land.  Eleven previously recorded sites were situated within the project area.  During the monitoring program, a substantial number of buried artifacts were encountered at one of the prehistoric—i.e., Native American—sites.  The artifact assemblage, consisting of groundstone implements, was found to be typical of the Milling Stone Horizon, ca. 8,000-2,000 BP.  The site was determined to qualify as a "historical resource," but the project's potential effects on the site were mitigated through the data recovered during the monitoring program and the presentation of a final report.

                    Monitoring during grading

Project in La Quinta, California

    An archaeological monitoring program was implemented on 51 acres of vacant land containing a locus of a previously recorded village site.  The locus was deemed to be a "historical resource" during a previous testing and mitigation program conducted by CRM TECH.  The on-site monitoring program resulted in the identification of seven archaeological features and associated artifacts.  The findings confirmed the significance of the locus and its eligibility for listing in the California Register of Historical Resources.  Mitigation of project effects on these features was accomplished through the data recovery efforts and compilation and presentation of a final report.

Country Club in Coachella Valley

    The project area for this Country Club is situated within a portion of the prehistoric Cahuilla village of Kavanish.  The on-site monitoring program for this project included close inspection of freshly uncovered layers of soil, data recovery excavations of subsurface features, and laboratory analysis of all cultural material recovered.  These procedures served to locate seven buried archaeological features and numerous cultural artifacts.  Five of the features were found to meet the statutory definition of "historical resources."  Project effects to these resources were accomplished through the data recovery efforts and compilation and presentation of a final report.

                Large pieces of Native American pottery 

HISTORIC BUILDINGS STUDIES

 

HISTORIC ARCHITECTURE AND BUILDING EVALUATIONS

                  An old jailhouse

 San Bernardino Project

    This project involved a comprehensive historical resources survey on approximately 1.2 square miles of fully developed urban land in the northern portion of the City of San Bernardino's downtown area.  The study entailed the recordation of more than 1,200 buildings predating 1957 as well as intensive historical background research for all of these structures.  As a result, CRM TECH delineated five proposed historic districts which were determined to be eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.

 The Spanish Inn

    The historical study for the Spanish Inn project was part of the environmental review process for a proposed renovation aimed at revitalizing and reopening the 1939-vintage hotel, which had been closed since the mid-1990s.  In order to determine whether the Spanish Inn complex represented a "historic property," as defined by NHPA Section 106, CRM TECH carried out an intensive-level field survey, historical background research, and consultation with the public.  The study concluded that the inn was one of the surviving resort hotels from Palm Springs' glamorous heyday in the 1930s-1950s and, thus, was eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.  CRM TECH recommended that the proposed renovation project should be carried out in accordance with the Secretary of Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation; however, if physical alteration to the complex was unavoidable, then a comprehensive documentation program should be undertaken to preserve the historical and architectural data about the property.

 Former Coachella Firehouse

    CRM TECH was contracted by the City of Coachella to evaluate the historical significance of the former Coachella Firehouse, which was constructed in 1930, as well as to document its history and architectural characteristics.  The results of the study indicated that the firehouse was the oldest surviving municipal service building in the city, retaining excellent historic integrity.  It was home to the city's fire protection commission and its volunteer fire department during the city's formative years leading to incorporation in 1946, and for several decades thereafter.  Thus, the Coachella Firehouse was determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.

ADAPTIVE USE STUDIES

El Solano Apartment Complex

    This project entailed an adaptive use study on a group of historic buildings that were, as a whole, previously determined to qualify as a "historic property."  In order to accomplish the goals of the study, CRM TECH carried out additional historical research and an intensive field inspection to ascertain information on specific architectural elements.  In order to ensure that the proposed renovation and rehabilitation of the complex was undertaken in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, CRM TECH compiled a list of primary, character-defining elements that should be preserved as well as secondary elements contributing to the complex's historic appearance.

 

Former Angelus Funeral Home

    The purpose of this study was to document and summarize the history and conditions of the building that housed the Angelus Funeral Home, and present rehabilitation guidelines and recommendations relating to the proposed rehabilitation of the building for adaptive use.  As a result of these procedures, CRM TECH found that the building met the State of California's official definition of a "historical resource."  Because many of the character-defining elements of the building were still present, CRM TECH recommended that the proposed project be undertaken in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation.  To assist the project proponent in protecting the historic integrity of the building, the study identified a number of primary, character-defining elements in the building that needed to be preserved or restored during the rehabilitation.

MITIGATIVE RECORDATIONS (HABS/HAER LEVEL)

Rowell Adobe House and Garage

    Built between 1939 and 1942, this residential complex was determined eligible for listing in the California Register of Historical Resources.  In order to mitigate any project impacts to this resource, CRM TECH compiled a detailed description of the buildings as well as a comprehensive summation of their history.  Photographs and maps of the ground plan were also generated as part of the mitigation program.

 

Bloomington Garage

    CRM TECH was contracted by the project proponent to mitigate impacts to the Bloomington Garage, a previously identified "historical resource."  Various procedures were undertaken in order to salvage and preserve the historical, architectural, and archaeological data contained in this resource.  These included photographic recordation of the building according to the Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines, on-site archaeological monitoring during grading operations, analysis of all artifacts recovered, and compilation of comprehensive documentation of the Bloomington Garage compatible to the criteria for documentation at a Level 2 of the Historic American Buildings Survey.  Through the implementation of these mitigation measures, the project's effects on this historical resource were reduced to a level that was less than significant.

 

PALEONTOLOGICAL STUDIES

 INVENTORIES

Village at the Palms

    CRM TECH performed a paleontological resource assessment on 80 acres of vacant land designated for a proposed residential development.  The study included record searches at the San Bernardino County Museum and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, pursuit of additional literature search, and an intensive-level field inspection of the project area. 

 Moon Camp Residential Subdivision

    The same procedures carried out for the Village at the Palms project were also undertaken for this project.  As a result, the study concluded that the project's potential impact on paleontological resources was determined to be moderate for Holocene vertebrate fossils on portions of the subject property.  Thus, a paleontological resource recovery program was recommended for those areas of potential impact.

Santa Rosa Roadway Improvement Project

    The Santa Rosa Roadway Improvement project entailed the reconstruction, paving, repair, and realignment of various existing roadway segments.  The paleontological study carried out by CRM TECH resulted in the identification of a number of areas along these roadways that possessed the potential to contain paleontological resources.  Thus, it was recommended that these areas be monitored by a qualified paleontologist during any earth-moving activities associated with the proposed project.

 MONITORING OF EARTH-MOVING ACTIVITIES

 Foxborough Grading Project

Central Los Angeles Area New High School No. 10

Vesting Tentative Tract No. 31167, the Country Gate Project

    CRM TECH has carried out over 100 paleontological monitoring programs throughout southern California.  The three projects listed above were recently carried out in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside Counties.  The monitoring programs consist primarily of observing all earth-moving activities in the project areas and closely inspecting freshly exposed soil surfaces for paleontological remains.  The recovery of paleontological resources is rare; however, at the Los Angeles site, the remains of a large marine mammal, most likely a whale, dating to about six million years ago were recovered during monitoring.

 MITIGATIVE DATA RECOVERY

 Calhoun Drive and 47th Street

    A paleontological mitigation program was carried out on approximately 22 acres of land situated on the corner of Calhoun Drive and 47th Street in the City of Indio, Riverside County, California.  As part of the mitigation program, CRM TECH paleontologists collected surface and subsurface samples of fossil shell associated with Holocene Lake Cahuilla.  The fossils were then taken to the CRM TECH laboratory for detailed analysis.

 

GENERAL PLANS/OVERVIEWS

Cultural Resource Element for the Big Bear Lake General Plan

    For this study, CRM TECH carried out a historical/archaeological resources records search, historical background research, a reconnaissance-level field survey, and consultations with the City and the local historical society.  These procedures resulted in the identification of two mains areas that were sensitive for prehistoric cultural resources and a third area that was sensitive for the possible presence of historic buildings dating to the pre-1920 period.

 Cultural Resource Element for the City of Fontana General Plan

    This overview study was carried out on an approximately 50-square-mile area in and around the City of Fontana.  The purpose of the study was to provide the City with the necessary information and analysis to facilitate cultural resources considerations in the planning process and in formulating city policies.  As a result, 79 archaeological sites, 114 pending sites, and numerous historic-era buildings that were considered significant by the local community.

 Cultural Resource Element for the City of La Quinta General Plan

    The study carried out by CRM TECH for the City of La Quinta General Plan showed that the city's unique geographical location straddling the ancient shoreline of Holocene Lake Cahuilla contains one of the densest concentrations of archaeological sites anywhere in California.  The study identified hundreds of prehistoric and historic-period sites as well as historic buildings dating to the 19th and early to mid-20th centuries.

 

SPECIFIC HISTORICAL/ETHNOHISTORICAL STUDIES

 

A Brief History of the Pechanga Indian Day School

Cabazon Resource Recovery Park

    CRM TECH has conducted extensive historical/ethnohistorical studies for local Native American groups.  Such research entails historical background research, archival and literature searches, and consultation with Native American groups.  The projects listed above are just two such studies recently conducted by CRM TECH
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